Climate

Flooding in South Sudan
Flooding in South Sudan
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Climate

The climate affects us all. But it doesn’t impact us equally.

Extreme weather events and changing weather patterns hit people in poor and marginalised communities hardest. And while an acute emergency like a hurricane can cause widespread devastation and loss of life, the ongoing consequences for people’s health can be just as dangerous. In our decades of work providing medical care in crisis settings, Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) teams have seen this first-hand.

Drinking water can become contaminated by flooding, leading to outbreaks of life-threatening diseases like cholera. Stagnant pools left after storms can become a breeding ground for malaria-carrying mosquitoes. Damaged crops can mean malnutrition, especially in children, resulting in weakened immune systems that are unable to fight off disease outbreaks. And as resources become scarce, competition can lead to conflict and displacement.

The current climate emergency is a health emergency. In this section you’ll find personal accounts from MSF staff responding to weather-related crises, and from teams working to reduce the impact on the planet.   

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