obstetrics

Wound day: Helping new mums in Nigeria fight infection

Pippa is an obstetrics and gynaecology consultant from the UK. She is currently on assignment with Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Jahun, part of northern Nigeria’s Jigawa state – working on a maternity project in an area where a high number of women and children die during childbirth. In this blog, she shares how her team treats women for complicated infections after a caesarean.

Once more into the breech dear friends - An emergency delivery in Nigeria

Pippa is an obstetrics and gynaecology consultant from the UK. She is currently on assignment with Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Jahun, northern Nigeria – returning after a break of five years. In this, her second blog, Pippa shares her experience of settling back in, as well as an emergency operation to save a mother's life.

The First 24 Hour Shift

The shift pattern for obstetricians is to take a 24 hour shift every three days. I’m one of the new generation of UK doctors and have never worked a 24 hour shift in hospital before, so I knew whatever happened this would be a first for me. The day itself started pretty routinely, I did the ward round and checked on how things worked and then settled down to wait for any patients.

In The Shadow of Ebola

The maternity unit at Gondama Referral Centre (GRC) in Bo only treats obstetric complications and emergencies. With that in mind I had been planning and expecting the obvious caesarean sections, difficult deliveries and postpartum complications. Before coming to Sierra Leone I read and re-read over the emergency procedures I thought I would be likely to need to do, discussed with my consultants different techniques and management plans and spent a lot of time going over scenarios in my head.