Groupe de champs
Wow

Pavithra goes from finding herself in charge of a a 140 bed hospital in the Congo to now also being the person responsible for the hospital pharmacy, thirty nurses, all the logistics involved in the project  as well as her actual job of trying to oversee the medical management of 140 patients including the ITU and supervise six doctors.

Wow, so it turns out I’m a pretty important person for MSF in North Kivu today. So remember how I couldn’t believe I was medically in charge of a 140 bed hospital in the Congo, well today not only am I that, but the expat Nursing Manager of the project has left, the Project Coordinator is being split between two sites and is currently at Kitchanga my old home, and the Logistician is stuck in Goma the project capital for the next week. So amusingly I am now also the person responsible for the hospital pharmacy, thirty nurses, all the logistics involved in the project from making sure there’s enough drugs in the pharmacy to sorting out the problem of the fact we are going to run out of food to serve the patients as of Sunday, as well as my actual job of trying to oversee the medical management of 140 patients including the ITU and supervise six doctors. Yesterday evening I carried every bunch of keys involved in the project – about 20 key rings. Oh and I have a radio.

Which, like my old bleep, is going off every five minutes.

Am feeling very important and not at all bitter. ;)

Although I am feeling surprisingly calm and almost vaguely cheerful. I think you may as well smile whilst you try to swim and not sink. Also am bemused and excited by the fact that I seem to understand most of what’s being said to me these days, which means my French is thankfully improving, although I have a sneaking suspicion that I still sound a little stupid when I speak it.

This morning, I chanced upon a cold dead child in the ITU. I think perhaps the first dead child I have ever seen. Sadly, I suspect, not the last.