Conjunto de campos
Day 6

The patient who had a ruptured ectopic pregnancy is doing fine. We rounded on her this morning at Jude Anne. She is having some pain, and is still a bit tachycardic, but stable.

The patient who had a ruptured ectopic pregnancy is doing fine. We rounded on her this morning at Jude Anne. She is having some pain, and is still a bit tachycardic, but stable.

On our arrival this morning, though, a UN ambulance had pulled up to the gate. A medic in full battle gear was leading a pregnant woman out. I caught up to him just as they approached, and said, in French, "This hospital is closed. The new one is in Cité Solidarité." The medic looked at me, shrugged, pushed the patient towards the gate. "No," I said, "we're closed. Aqui, cerrado." The UN unit in this part of town is Brazilian, but I don't speak Portugese. I was hoping my Spanish was more comprehensible to him than my French. (Didn't even try English.)

It must have been quite comical, really. He was trying to nudge the patient into the gate. I was trying to stop him. I was trying to speak to him, he was not understanding any language I know. Finally, after several tries of, "non, aqui, cerrado!" comprehension dawned across his face. He smiled, nodded, and whisked the patient away.

We had four patients in Jude Anne. I lectured the staff in small groups about the surgical transfer team. The OT team started packing the second OR. We distributed boxes to everyone: back to boxes and tape and packing lists.

And, we had four patients in Solidarité, plus one baby. Today, we accomplished our second and third surgeries. More patients are coming through the door: at least to check out the facilities, even if they have no physical complaints besides pregnancy.