Fieldset
Furcy, Haiti

Here in the mountains, it is cool and quiet. All the ambient noise stress of Port-au-Prince is absent. No generators, no traffic. You can hear voices from below in the valley. The wind rustles the pine trees. It's lovely and peaceful. A good place for restoration and re-grounding.

Here in the mountains, it is cool and quiet. All the ambient noise stress of Port-au-Prince is absent. No generators, no traffic. You can hear voices from below in the valley. The wind rustles the pine trees. It's lovely and peaceful. A good place for restoration and re-grounding.

Re-grounding is necessary. Friday was a busy day. I had intended to get to some of the meat of reports that are overdue and plans that are urgent. Instead, after doing rounds and one circuit of the hospital to see what was going on, I then had a list of things. Six requests for logistics. Three big issues to discuss with the project coordinator. Two subjects, probably for new protocols, for the chief gynecologist. It seemed that every time I sat down at my desk to start something, I had to get up immediately to urgently attend to something else.

The public hospitals are again not functioning. One is on strike. The other is having intermittent electricity problems and a more chronic oxygen problem. The others are full. Again, then, we have problems transferring patients out and focusing on the most critically complicated pregnancies.

Still to do: the monthly medical report, which is very, very late because of the move; create a global plan to address the shortage in our blood bank; revise the job profile for the expat gynecologist who is arriving soon (and who will eventually take over my job); start formally evaluating the local doctors that I supervise; improve our HIV program...