Fieldset
Day - 3

We moved furniture in today. Most impressively, the OR table – which takes ten men to lift. It had to come down the stairs at Jude Anne, into the moving truck, then out of the moving truck, and up the stairs at Solidarité. Mostly, I'm thankful that no one was hurt in the process.

We moved furniture in today. Most impressively, the OR table – which takes ten men to lift. It had to come down the stairs at Jude Anne, into the moving truck, then out of the moving truck, and up the stairs at Solidarité. Mostly, I'm thankful that no one was hurt in the process. That table is a beast.

That went into the second truckload of things. It was preceded by a quantity of boxes, beds, tables, shelves, etc.

In the meantime, major cleaning went on in the new operating room. It's not yet totally disinfected, but all the collected crud from construction has now been expunged, even as they were putting the last touches of paint on the door frames. Tomorrow the OR team will settle in and set up. That's for the first theatre only, and a small recovery room.

Jude Anne continued packing: post-partum ward finished packing and was transported, sterilization started packing to prepare for their move tomorrow, small procedures room also getting ready. The big autoclave in sterilization will also be a beast.

Also today: several fridges. Apparently fridges have to sit for 24h after being moved, before you can plug them in. The electrical plug in the lab isn't ready to receive the fridge yet, anyway. Unfortunately, the lab isn't ready to receive much. There are still tiles to lay around the sinks. The walls need paint. The air conditioner has not yet been installed. The lights aren't finished. And the room needs a deep cleaning.

As opposed to logistics, who are these days doing everything all the time, my job is an everything-and-nothing job. I try to make sure things are going according to plan, or that the modified plan still makes medical sense. I spend a lot of time explaining and communicating what's supposed to happen, and when. I've packed about two boxes, and lifted about two objects. I write protocols. I distribute call schedules special for the move. I'm trying to prevent the medical team from having a nervous breakdown, also to avoid having one myself. I need to make sure important details aren't forgotten.

Then there is what logistics calls 'The List of 1000'. Those are all the things we will ask for once the move has finished, after Day +7. I'm sure that list will keep them occupied for at least the next six months. Right now, what we're doing is triage of tasks: is it essential and must be done now' Or can we add that to the List of 1000'

Patient census today: four patients, no babies.