Fieldset
It was very painful but we did our best to help people

I’m a nurse from Bangui. When the conflict broke out my clinic got looted I stayed home and did nothing. Then MSF came and hired me. I started working on a mobile clinic out of Bossangoa in December. We found there were people who had a lot of difficulties, which was really sad.

I’m a nurse from Bangui. When the conflict broke out my clinic got looted I stayed home and did nothing. Then MSF came and hired me. I started working on a mobile clinic out of Bossangoa in December. We found there were people who had a lot of difficulties, which was really sad. Some of the people we met had their legs and arms cut off, some were seriously injured. It was very painful but we did our best to help people to get out of those difficulties. That was a moment that impressed me a lot.

We would travel miles to small villages and find them empty, because people had fled to the bush. We met many people who had lost family members, or had their homes and fields burned to the Seleka. Sometimes we would find people with serious burns, gunshot wounds, or cut by machetes. When we would arrive in a village we would send out the word we were there, for people to come out of the bush and be treated.

I am not afraid. I committed myself as a humanitarian to assist people.

 


Over one year has passed since the coup d’état, and fighting between armed groups, the Seleka and the anti-Balaka, has plunged the Central African Republic into chaos.

People from the town of Bossangoa and its surrounding area were some of those hard hit. Homes and fields were burned, and people were killed.

The Christian population took refuge at the local Catholic Mission, and Muslim civilians fled first to a school called Ecole Liberte, and then by truck convoys to relative safety in Chad.

A handful of MSF workers in Bossangoa witnessed it all: