Fieldset
It Can Spread Very Quickly and People Can Die Very Quickly

Above, MSF nurse Donna Canali explains cholera to visitors at the Refugee Camp exhibit.

Above, MSF nurse Donna Canali explains cholera to visitors at the Refugee Camp exhibit.

And here are some striking excerpts from the journal she kept while working in Lumbago, Angola, in 2006 and 2007 during a cholera outbreak. She describes her life in Angola as well as the MSF project and the situations of some of her patients.

25 December 2006

It's Christmas Day here in the city of Lumbago, Province of Huila, Country of Angola in southeastern Africa. The blue sky is populated with large puffy clouds varying in color from a brilliant white to a threatening black. The streets are rutted where they are not paved and have an abundance of potholes where they are paved. Both holes and ruts hold yesterday's rain along with an assortment of garbage and, at times, excrement. Walking from house to office and office to the Cholera Treatment Center (CTC) it is always wise to step carefully. Although it has rained everyday, I'm sorry to say that I have yet to hear a clap of thunder or see a bolt of lightening. It's a bit muggy today, a bit hot in the sun and very pleasant in the shade. Often a light jacket is required during the afternoon or evening when the wind comes up. I love the weather.

The ex-pat emergency team here in Lubango is very large - about 20 or 22. There are Italians, French (many), Croatian, Lebanese, Argentinean, Dutch, Canadian, and a couple of others from places that I don't recall right now. It's a United Nations of languages that are spoken here, but those heard most often are French, Spanish, and English. People speak varying amounts of Portuguese but no one is fluent. The national language is Portuguese.