Fieldset
1 month after my medications, and still going strong!

It's been a month after my medications have finished, and I feel pretty good to say that the mental side effects that came along with all of my medications seem to have disappeared now.... AT LEAST FOR NOW!!! *Insert evil laugh here.

It's been a month after my medications have finished, and I feel pretty good to say that the mental side effects that came along with all of my medications seem to have disappeared now.... AT LEAST FOR NOW!!! *Insert evil laugh here. Nah, it's honestly very good to have a clear head on my shoulders again. I've been very busy over the last month or so, as I've been writing a script with my brother Connor, based loosely on the situation that I went through in hospital, and the experience that I've had with TB over the past 18 months... and when I say loosely, I mean very bloody loosely. It's a comic fantasy about a man who needs the help of the internet to escape the reality of his illness, and uses his computer to take him far away out of his hospital room, to another world. A world full of new faces, and new people to help keep him entertained and distracted from the harsh realities of his disease. I think in a large way this is how I personally dealt with my TB experience. I know it's different for everyone, but for me, to think about it, write about it, explore it, and look at the interesting ways it so drastically restricted my life, made me face it and understand that whether I liked it or not, my life was not going to be the same for the 18 months it was going to take to treat it. A friend of mine sent me this picture the other day, and I immediately wanted to share it on this blog page... It doesn't have much to do with TB in general, but I feel like it has a lot to do with the way that I faced my own experience of TB... Because there were a few times during my stay in hospital where I wondered if trying to make light of my own disease was not the right way to go about my treatment. I felt that it might be insensitive, or that it was not cool to joke about being seriously ill. I was worried that other people with TB might find my Youtube videos offensive, or that it might have been rude to other people who have lost loved ones to this terrible disease... But then I came to my own personal decision that there is no right way to handle something difficult. There is no right way to handle the death of a loved one, or no right way to explain horror to someone else... And there is certainly no rule book that says just because you have a disease you should lie down and allow yourself to become a typical self-pitying patient. For me personally, creativity and craziness felt like the best way to re-direct my frustration, and humour felt like the only escape. So here's to the crazy ones! the crazy ones