Fieldset
Four frontline stories from our teams - February 2022

This month's highlights from the Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) blog.

Eswatini: “To the women: Go there, do it!”

We are different, we can’t all be doctors in the world, we are different types of people. Everyone has their own unique gift...

Drivers are vital to all of MSF's projects, using their skills and local knowledge to ensure staff, patients, equipment and supplies travel safely in sometimes hazardous terrain. In Eswatini, driving is a role traditionally associated with men, but Fikile Ngwenya wasn't going to let that stand in her way...

FIKILE'S STORY >

 


Nigeria: "Children are no longer dying of lead poisoning in Zamfara"

The fact that fewer young children are dying or getting sick because of lead poisoning is a major achievement, but it's not the only one...

In 2010, MSF received an alert. Children dying in alarming numbers, with no clear cause. A team were sent to investigate, beginning a project that was to last for the next twelve years...

BENJAMIM'S STORY >

 


Asifa and Samira: Mental health in Marib, Yemen

hasina_msb115938.jpg

Two women walk in the grounds of an MSF health facility

Supporting our women migrant patients is always challenging as their smugglers often accompany them everywhere. They are not allowed to talk to people if there is no medical emergency...

Marib was once considered one of the safest places in Yemen. Now war, displacement and poverty are leaving their marks on the mental health of the region's inhabitants. The needs are 'overwhelming' says Hasina Nouroj, MSF's mental health activities manager...

HASINA'S STORY >

 


Afghanistan: “It all starts with a simple ABCDE”

rebecca_msb107287.jpg

A paediatric consultation

The nurse squeezed the Ambu bag and gently inflated the baby’s lungs. One, two, three, four, five.

At a newly opened emergency unit in Herat, Afghanistan, MSF nurse Rebecca is training a team to triage more than 400 patients a day...

REBECCA'S STORY >