Author Archives: Ruby Siddiqui

Ruby in the Philippines

Ruby is currently writing about her work on our emergency response to typhoon Haiyan on our Philippines blog. Read her blog plus first-hand accounts from other MSF team members here.

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All talk and no action

We breakfast on hot sugary tea and fried dough balls (a bit like beignets but without the sugar). I completely associate these with Chad. Just like the barbequed meat (cow? goat?) from the roadside grills that you dip into a … Continue reading

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What are baby goats called?

The return journey to N’Djamena is all about the animals. We see three types of monkey, camels, new born donkeys, horses and goats and even a deer. Of course each time I tried to take a photo, the animals disappeared. … Continue reading

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Emergency response to astonishing rise in malaria

I’m being eaten alive. We’re outnumbered and the mosquitoes are ravenous! Every inch of skin is covered in bites. I’m one big allergic mess. I’ve arrived in Am Timan, the main town in Salamat region, SE Chad because of a … Continue reading

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Day 30 – leaving South Sudan

Randra or Suby? The team are trying to decide what acronym they should use for me and Sandra, along the lines of Brangelina and Tomkat. Sandra and I have been inseparable. We work together, we share the same tent, we’re … Continue reading

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Day 29 – the things you remember

She wrapped her arms round my neck and I never wanted to let go. This little girl, as light as a feather, dressed in her best frock. It’s my last day. I have been bumped off countless flights but tomorrow … Continue reading

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Day 28 – pressure

Maram* is not the answer to everything. We can use it to build new roads, to create stands for bladder tanks (huge 10,000L water distribution vessels) and even to absorb swampy lakes outside tents (!) but it can’t be used … Continue reading

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Day 27 – silent children

It’s the silent ones that you notice. In an outpatient’s department (OPD) full of people and screaming children you notice the ones that are quiet. It might mean something’s seriously wrong. The hospital is seriously swamped after we start our … Continue reading

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Day 24 – Happy Independence Day

Happy Independence Day South Sudan! And what festivities there were, even in Jamam camp full of non-citizens. There was music and laughter until the early hours and a military procession along the only road passable at the moment. We of … Continue reading

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Day 22 – standing in line

Kowaja! Kowaja! Kowaja! Or the mouse shuffling round the tent at night. Or the dahl every…single…day! I’m trying to list all the things I WON’T miss about Jamam. It will make leaving easier. It somehow feels like you’re abandoning a … Continue reading

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